Hello!

This is a project that Owen Powell and Alex Horne started on October 24th, 2006 (United Nations Day), and finished on October 24th, 2007. Our aim was to prove that London is the most cosmopolitan city in the world, by endeavouring to meet and chat to a citizen from every country in the world who currently lives and works in London.

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We managed to meet people from 189 countries. According to the UN, there are 192 countries in the world, so we've proved that at the very least, London contains over 98.4% of the nations of the world!

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We are still looking for people from three countries:

Marshall Islands; Palau; Tuvalu.

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The final encounters during our year appear below, but to follow our story from the start please click on the links under 'How we're doing' on the left-hand side.  The countries appear in the order in which we found their representative. (Any country with an asterisk * next to it has a brief account of the interview - longer versions will appear in the future!)

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To find out more about the project, including our self-imposed rules, then click here.

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Follow this link if you have the urge to see us looking awkward on Channel 4 news.  Or just below you can see us when we were half-way through the project being interviewed by George Alagiah on BBC World.

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Please email us on worldinonecity@hotmail.com if you want to get in touch, or if you know any shy Londoners who are also Tuvaluan, Palauan or Marshallese.

George Alagiah interviews us on the BBC

Wednesday, 24 October 2007

Countries that we're still very much looking for:


WANTED

Hello there. Due to popular demand (and because it's a good idea which we really should have thought of ourselves), here is a list of the countries for which we still have no leads. If you are from one of these countries and you now live and work in London, please do get in touch (worldinonecity@hotmail.com)! Or, if you know someone who fits that bill, please do also get in touch (same email address)! Here they are:

Marshall Islands
Palau
Tuvalu

17 comments:

z said...

Would not the easy thing be to hang out outside the embassy or consulate of these countries?
or is that considered not fair play?

Alex and Owen said...

Hello Z,

That's a very good point but unfortunately our self-imposed but fairly brief rules state that we are not allowed to go near embassies as these are officially considered foreign soil. We are also forbidden from accepting tourists.

If we ever get to the point that we're just looking for people from Tuvalu, Kiribati and Nauru we may have to revise these restrictions.

Have a great weekend,

Alex and Owen

Timmy Magic said...

Edgware Rd is good for finding Middle East people - Oman, Yemen, UAE etc

Pon-Pon said...

Taiwan is arguably a country. It's been completely and DEMOCRATICALLY self-governed since 1945, though China still considers it a renegade province. China has not contributed to Taiwan's culture, economy, government since 1945, but Taiwan is still not internationally recognized as a country by the UN or the WHO which leads to problems procuring international resources such as during the recent SARs scare. Obviously, I am pro Taiwan independence, seeing as how it has contributed for so long to the global economy but is not receiving much support in return. If your goal is to tag all the UN countries then China is sufficient to cover both China and Taiwan. However, if your goal is to identify London as the most diverse city by identifying people from different areas defined by geographic and political boundaries then you should consider Taiwan. Just a thought. Until 2005, there had been no direct flights between Taiwan and China for 55 years. Taiwan issues its own passport for international travel. It also has its own Olympic team.

Jim said...

Shakey - I can sort Grenada. Some of my second XI in Turnham Green CC are from there. Will email you to sort...

JimF

Veronica said...

I work with a girl from Cameroon, one from Hungary and a guy from Uganda (among many others). Plus I know a guy from Montenegro. Only, at the moment I don't have their email addresses, so I can't let them know about this before a few days - until I see them personally, that is. When I see them, what should I say to them? That you'd want to meet them? Or maybe just give them the url to this blog, and they'll see if they want to contact you.
Oh, and I'm Italian by the way!
Cheers

Alex and Owen said...

Hi Veronica,

Congratulations on having such a cosmpolitan job - what is it that you do?!

We'd love to meet your Ugandan, Hungarian and Cameroonian colleagues, as well as your friend from Montenegro. All we'd want to do is buy them a coffee (or any sort of drink really) and chat to them for half an hour or so. Maybe we could come to wherever you work and meet them all together?

Our email address is worldinonecity@hotmail.com so let us know what you think would be best.

Yours very gratefully,

Alex and Owen

Jennifer said...

Pop down to Southwark college, especially the Camberwell branch. actually, any of them (Waterloo or Bermondsey) would be good.

I taught there and had people from Senegal, Sierra Leone, Cote'Ivoire, Iran, Vietman, Bangladesh, Ukraine, Nigeria and Sudan in the same class.

Adrian said...

I just heard you on Virgin Radio, and this is a brilliant idea. Good luck!

I suggest you try searching http://www.facebook.com/ for some of your missing countries, which allows you to search for people living in London, but who's home country is in your list. Simply join the London network to be able to search...

Nia said...

Need anyone form the tiny south pacific island of Tonga?

look no further than me!!
or if your really desperate i could ask round the pacific community via the coconut wireless and see if we have anyone from either Vanuatu or Tuvalu.

:D

Alex and Owen said...

Jennifer, Adrian, and Nia,

I'm going to (perhaps a bit rudely) reply to you all at once. Firstly, thanks for the comments! We'll have a look at Southwark College once we're back in London in late August. Facebook - well, we're both on it individually, and a lot of people have suggested tapping it as a good international seam, but I think we're going to hold off until we get near the end. We enjoy going out and meeting people too much. Nia! Tonga! Thanks for the offer, but unfortunately we have already found a Tongan. He's called Tonga, and he plays international rugby for (you've guessed it) Tonga. We're hoping to meet him in September. (If you're a massive rugby fan, drop us an email and we'll get you along as well).

Bye!

Owen and Alex

Alex and Owen said...

Oh. Forgot to say.

Nia! Hello again. Please do root out the old coconut phone and see what the Tuvalu situation is like. We have now met a Vanuatuan, but Kiribati, Palau, Nauru, Micronesia, the Marshall Islands and the Solomon Islands are still very much up for grabs.

Ta!

Siri H said...

I read about your project in The Guardian while desperately trying to stay awake outside Pisa airport in the middle of the night. (Ryanair flights do depart at very uncomfortable times of the day - and night.)I found your project so exciting that I did not fall asleep. I'm Norwegian, but unfortunately for me you have already met Ida from Norway. Otherwise I would have had the perfect excuse to go to London.I teach English in upper secondary school and I'm certainly going to tell my students to access your webpage. They have all been to London (Oxford Street, Madame Tussaud's etc.) but they probably haven't realised how multi-cultural the city really is.

Susie said...

Hello Alex and Owen.

Love the good work, such a good idea. I did a part time Spanish course at the University of Westminster a few years ago, and my teacher was Cuban. Can't remember his name, so it's a long shot, but thought I'd let you know anyway!

Good luck!

elham said...

Intriguing and fascinating approach. I recently read your article on London's Evening Standard. I am from Djibouti but I am Canadian. Unfortunately, that would make me a tourist.
Your best bet is to meet someone from Somalia...chances are they might be able to help you find someone from Djibouti because Djiboutiens are also Somalis. We're all the same, just from different territories.
Best of luck guys. :)

mrs k said...

Looking forward to you competing your project and then publishing a book with all the contents of this blog in it. I will buy it.

Benivolent said...

That's a very good point but unfortunately our self-imposed but fairly brief rules state that we are not allowed to go near embassies as these are officially considered foreign soil. We are also forbidden from accepting tourists.